2017 Libertas Legislation Tracker

Out of the ~1,000 bills introduced during each year's general legislative session, Libertas Institute highlights those that have a particular interest to our mission of championing individual liberty, private property, and free enterprise.

NOTE: New bills are being added daily, and as the session progresses we will be updating the status of each of the bills below here on the Tracker. Check back often for updates!

Key: Libertas supports the bill Libertas opposes the bill     Libertas considers these bills its top priority for the session

Click here to view a readable list of the bills included in this index, along with their summaries and explanations.

Tip: You can hover over any of the rows in the table below to see a summary of what it is and why we support or oppose it. Click any table cell in the header to re-sort the entire table.


Proposed bills

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Think we missed a bill, or that our position is wrong? Let us know!


Bill Title Sponsor LI's position Status Votes Actions
Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Amendments

Utah law allows prosecutors to permanently obtain ownership of property taken from a person who has not been charged with, let alone convicted of, a crime. This bill would reform forfeiture law to require a criminal conviction in forfeiture cases where a property owner is fighting back.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. We have been working for several years to illustrate the problems with this policy and fight the taxpayer-funded lobbying efforts of police and prosecutorial entities in the state. Due process and property rights are being violated; this law would help stop these problems.

Greene, B.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 11-1
House, 58-10
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Affordable Housing Amendments

This bill spends millions of taxpayer dollars to provide affordable housing for low-income Utahns.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. While we encourage individuals to help those in need and practice thrift and personal responsibility, it is not the role of government compel taxpayers to providing housing to other Utahns.

Edwards, R.OpposePending Senate actionHouse cmte, 7-0
House, 50-22
Senate cmte, 4-0
Senate 2nd, 26-3
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Social Security Tax Credit

Utah law requires payment of social security income—despite the fact that social security payments were already based on taxed income throughout the person's life. This bill would provide a tax credit to seniors who heavily depend on social security, preventing a double taxation situation.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. It is an important first step to future expansion of this tax credit that would promote financial security and self-reliance for seniors who have structured their retirement to depend upon these promised payments.

Westwood, J.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 8-1
House, 51-21
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Campus Free Speech Amendments

This bill limits the ability of taxpayer-funded universities in Utah to restrict the free speech rights of its students, allowing students to file suit against the school for violation of the law.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Government universities must allow protest and spontaneous demonstrations without any intervention, unless public safety legitimately warrants it.

Coleman, K.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 11-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
End of Life Options Act

This bill legally allows a physician, under narrow circumstances, to prescribe life-ending drugs to a terminally ill patient wishing to end their own life.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Suicide should be discouraged and resources provided to help those considering this option. However, individuals can end their own life, and should not be impeded by laws that prohibit doctors (as medical gatekeepers) from providing the drugs necessary to do so.

Chavez-Houck, R.SupportTabled in committeeTabled, 9-3Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Private Attorney General Doctrine

Several years ago, the Utah legislature passed a law that prohibits courts from compensating individuals who successfully overturn a law that violated the rights of the public at large. Utah is the only state that prohibits this by law. This bill would repeal that prohibition, thereby allowing courts to award such fees once more.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. In a case where a government agency is violating the public's rights, the Attorney General would be duty bound to defend the government; incentives are needed such that private citizens can act in the public interest to overturn such laws.

Greene, B.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 8-2Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Physical Restraint in Schools

Current law allows public school teachers to use corporal punishment with parental approval, and physical restraint of a student for damage to property. This bill removes the authority to use corporal punishment and limits the restraint in cases of property damage only to instances in which one's physical safety is at risk.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Teachers should not be empowered to use coercion against a child unless absolutely necessary—and never as a punishment for a perceived offense.

Moss, C.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 10-0
House, 74-1
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Occupational… Licensure Review Committee Amendments

This bill modifies a legislative committee that has oversight over occupational licensure—the area of law that requires a person to obtain a permission slip prior to offering their services to others. Among other important changes to the law, the bill empowers the committee to review existing licenses and find potentially less burdensome regulatory methods to still protect public safety.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. A recent report ranked our state as being the 12th most burdensome for occupational licensure, and reform is needed. Empowering this committee to investigate these issues is a good first step in that direction.

Greene, B.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 12-0
House, 67-5
Senate cmte, 4-1
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Bigamy Offense Amendments

Currently a polygamist can be charged for bigamy if they purport to be married (a clear free speech issue) or cohabit with another person who is not their spouse. This bill basically changes the "or" to an "and," requiring prosecutors to prove both circumstances in order to obtain a conviction.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. While this bill would otherwise be a good thing—heightening the difficulty of being prosecuted for bigamy—it is not being advanced in a vacuum. The Attorney General's office is trying to moot a lawsuit against the state that has been appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court. For that reason, their efforts should be opposed.

Noel, M.OpposePending House actionHouse cmte, 7-3Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Institutions of Higher Education Disclosure Requirements

This bill requires government-run universities to disclose on their respective websites critical information for prospective students like job placement data, average earnings of graduates, and total costs for degree programs.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. It is not only important for students weighing their options between different schools and degree programs to have this kind of information, but also that taxpayers can be aware of the costs and success of the programs of higher education institutions.

Coleman, K.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 8-0
House, 75-0
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Firearms Amendments

This bill would allow legal gun owners above the age of 21 to carry a concealed weapon without having to pay the government a fee to obtain a permit.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. It is "common sense carry"—since adults can openly carry an unloaded firearm without a permit, they should not be criminalized should they put a jacket on over the firearm, thereby concealing it.

Perry, L.SupportPending committee actionEmail your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Juvenile Offenses Amendments

This bill lowers criminal penalties for minors who engage in consensual sexual activity, with the penalty being lowered based on the age of each individual relative to one another.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Imposing felonies on sexually active children can ruin their lives, and though it may be inappropriate, the activity should not be criminalized to this degree when their ages are close together.

Roberts, M.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 7-3Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Health Insurance Right to Shop Amendments

This bill requires the state's health care insurer of government employees to allow them to shop for lower cost options, providing them with a financial incentive to do so.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. We hope that awareness of this option, and the reduction in price that happens when people are aware of the costs of the services they use, will result in pressure for private health care insurers to create a similar program.

Thurston, N.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 9-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Living Wage Amendments

This bill would raise the minimum wage to $15 in a phased approach over the next five years.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Increasing the minimum wage serves as a barrier to entry for teenagers and unskilled workers for whom opportunities decrease as employers are unable to afford their low skill work which would otherwise provide them an opportunity to increase skill, gain experience, and increase pay.

Hemingway, L.OpposeHeld in committeeHeld in cmte, 10-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Driving Under the Influence and Public Safety Revisions

This bill would lower the legal blood alcohol concentration level from 0.08% to 0.05%, criminalizing a whole host of drivers who have not harmed another person or property.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. According to data from the state, the average BAC level for DUI arrestees is nearly 0.15%, almost twice the existing legal limit. Lowering this limit would be a first in the nation, and would have the effect of criminalizing people who may be unwisely driving after a drink or two, but who are not necessarily impaired nor recklessly driving.

Thurston, N.OpposePending House actionHouse cmte, 9-2Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Municipal Enterprise Fund Amendments

The Utah Supreme Court has said that fees charged by a city cannot be used for things that do not pertain to what the fee was paid for, but cities aren't complying, and some use their fee revenue as a slush fund to pay for other things. This bill helps put a stop to that practice.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. If cities need more revenue for general government purposes, they should go through the process of raising taxes rather than deceptively raise fees.

Moss, J.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 6-3Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Human Trafficking Amendments

This bill would add certain human trafficking offenses to the list of crimes for which the death penalty can be imposed.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. No other state has this requirement, and Utah already has the longest list of offenses for which the death penalty can be sought. As we have explained elsewhere and at great length, capital punishment is an ineffective deterrent, too costly, and most tragically, can lead to the execution of people who were actually innocent of the crime for which they were convicted. This bill takes the entire scheme in the wrong direction.

Ray, P.OpposePending Senate actionHouse cmte, 6-5
House, 38-37
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Good Landlord Program Revisions

Several cities in Utah effectively force landlords to exclude convicts on probation or parole from renting their properties within four years of their conviction. This bill repeals the law that authorizes this, protecting the right of property owners to determine to whom they wish to rent their property.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. One of the most important things needed by those exiting the prison system in order to reintegrate into society is a place to live. Excluding these individuals is destructive to peaceful ends and violative of the property rights of the landlord.

King, Brian S.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 8-5
House, 62-9
Senate cmte, 5-1
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Pharmacy Compounding Amendments

Utah law currently prohibits compounding pharmacies from preparing drugs that are "regularly and commonly available from a manufacturer," which limits competition and protects the pharmaceutical industry. This bill eliminates that prohibition, allowing compounding pharmacies to prepare medications for a patient even if alternatives are commercially available.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. As advocates of a free market, we support measures such as this to remove unnecessary regulations that unfairly protect certain competitors.

Ward, R.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 7-4Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Concealed Carry Amendments

Utah law allows adults age 21 and over to obtain a concealed carry permit. This bill would create a provisional permit accessible to adults age 18 to 21 to conceal carry a firearm.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. The right to keep and bear arms is fundamental and should be available to all adults; this bill is a path in the right direction.

Lisonbee, K.SupportPending Senate actionHouse cmte, 10-1
House, 63-12
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Specie Legal Tender Amendments

This bill would allow public treasurers to hold and transact in gold and silver, which are already authorized as legal tender under state law.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. The state should have the option to transact in sound money as opposed to fiat currency.

Ivory, K.SupportPending committee actionHeld in cmte, 10-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Juvenile Justice Amendments

This bill incorporates many changes proposed as part of a comprehensive review of the juvenile justice system with many different stakeholders. There are multiple benefits to the proposals, including make clear that juveniles guilty of status offenses (for example, school truancy) should not end up in juvenile detention.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Without much oversight the number of laws, and the method of their enforcement, has led to many injustices in the "justice" system. This legislation helps move the system in a better direction.

Snow, V. L.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 12-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Short-Term Rental Amendments

This bill prevents cities from prohibiting home owners from renting their owner-occupied property on a short-term basis.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Property rights allow a home owner to share their property, whether with a relative or a friend or a traveler compensating them. This legislation is a great first step in the right direction.

Knotwell, J.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 13-1Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Duty to Retreat Amendments

This bill clarifies Utah law to state that a person repelling force or threatened force is not required to retreat to safety if doing so is an option.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. A person's right to defend themselves should not be violated merely because a judge or jury believes that a safer alternative may have been available at the time.

Maloy, A.C.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 6-4Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Safety Inspection Amendments

This bill repeals the vehicle safety inspection program in Utah.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. As we wrote in a recent public policy brief, Utah is the only western state to require this program, which lacks any supporting evidence to demonstrate it actually reduces mechanical failures. The program should be eliminated.

McCay, D.SupportPending committee actionHouse cmte, 9-3
House, 45-29
Email your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Direct to Consumer Food Sales Modifications

Food regulations were designed, and are properly intended, for cases in which food is sold to consumers who are unaware of the food's source or safety. This is not the case in direct-from-farm sales to an informed consumer, and therefore these costly regulations should not be applied to such situations.

Libertas Institute supports this bill, having called for this exemption from law in the publication of our Public Policy Brief on the subject. A "buyer beware" approach should be a legal option for consumers and farmers who want to directly exchange food.

Roberts, M.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 11-2Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Free Expression Regulation by Local Government

This bill codifies case law to require cities to have valid time, place, or manner restrictions on free expression that are narrowly tailored, not restricted based on the content, and leave open ample alternative means of expression.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Cities should not have the ability to violate court rulings on this important matter and should not be able to deny the free speech rights of their citizens.

Thurston, N.SupportPending House actionHouse cmte, 12-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Public Safety Officer Privacy Amendments

This bill would prohibit the name of a police officer being released to the public when the officer is involved in a critical incident until the investigation is concluded or six months has passed, whichever is first.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. This same protection is not afforded to individuals, and especially in cases where the officer used excessive force or was unjustified in their use of force, this imbalance allows police and prosecutors to establish a public narrative favorable to their point of view for months with no competition or pushback from the other side. A discriminatory policy such as this should not exist, as it creates an unfair balance between individuals and the police officers they employ.

McKell, M.OpposePending committee actionEmail your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Housing Pilot Program for Low-income Students

This bill seeks to provide $250,000 per year in taxpayer dollars to a nonprofit organization that provides housing for low-income college students in Salt Lake County. These funds must be matched by private donors or investors. The housing must have no initial cost to the student and may not require the student to go into debt for the housing.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. College is already heavily subsidized by taxpayers, and that dependency should be reduced, rather than increased as this bill does. It is not the role of government to force taxpayers to provide housing for adults wishing to attend college.

Winder, M.OpposePending House actionHouse cmte, 8-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Occupational Licensing Amendments

This bill requires the state regulatory agency overseeing occupational licensure to provide a license to a person who has been previously licensed in another state, eliminating the requirement that they jump through hoops in Utah that they don't need to.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. We see reciprocity as a common sense way to reduce existing licensure burdens by providing an opportunity for individuals that move to Utah to obtain a license here without having to duplicate the efforts they have already made in another state to qualify for a similar license.

Thurston, N.SupportPending committee actionEmail your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Criminal Procedure Revisions

This bill helps ensure justice is served by making juries informed of their power to hold a person not guilty, even if a law was violated, if a conviction would create a manifest injustice. It also would inform juries about the potential sentence faced by the defendant if convicted.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Juries serve an important purpose but they cannot fulfill that purpose if they do not understand their role.

Roberts, M.SupportPending committee actionEmail your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Telehealth Pilot Project

This bill proposes spending $350,000 in taxpayer money to fund a telehealth pilot project to increase access or convenience to health care, including in rural populations in the state.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Taxpayers should not be compelled to fund telehealth projects for those who choose to live in rural areas, especially since commercial providers are already innovating and expanding access to telehealth services.

Edwards, R.OpposePending House actionHouse cmte, 10-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Voter Records Amendments

This bill would limit who can access the list of registered voters, allowing it to be obtained only by government officials, political parties, or non-profit organizations whose purpose deals directly with election and voter integrity.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Those who elect to register to vote utilize their political power to affect others, such as increasing their taxes or decreasing their freedom. As such, their identity must be public to organizations, researchers, pollsters, and more, much like a defendant as the right to face their accuser in court.

Edwards, R.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Local Option Sales and Use Tax Modifications

This bill would allow cities to impose an additional .10% tax on residents in counties where the local option sales and use tax was not increased in the previous election.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. If local municipalities truly were in such need of funding for transportation, then they should find ways to adjust their budgets to find the funding they need. Lavish recreation centers, golf courses, and fitness equipment are just some of items that cities sometimes prioritize above needed transportation projects. At a time when Utah taxpayers are already dealing with numerous new taxes and facing still more, another sales tax increase is unnecessary and irresponsible.

Daw, B.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Tobacco Age Restriction Amendments

This bill raises the age limit for individuals wishing to purchase tobacco or tobacco products from 19 to 21.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Adults should have access to legal products. If the age of legal adulthood is 18, these persons should have the right to legally purchase products such as tobacco.

Eliason, S.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Expungement Amendments

This bill makes it easier for a past criminal to expunge their crime—have the government records regarding that circumstance be deleted—in select situations without worrying that violation of a petty offense, such as jaywalking or speeding, would eliminate that opportunity.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Convicts who have made full restitution should, under limited circumstances, be able to shed that label without losing the opportunity due to a petty offense.

Thatcher, D.SupportPending House actionSenate, 25-0
House cmte, 9-0
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Utah Marriage Commission Amendments

This bill raises the marriage license fee by $20, offering a rebate for the same amount to couples who obtain the government-approved pre-marital education.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Government should not be in the business of marriage. Absent that needed change, it should certainly not increase the hurdle one must jump over in order to obtain the state's permission to marry. While pre-marital counseling can be helpful, it should not be used as extortion to reclaim one's own money.

Christensen, A.OpposePending committee actionSenate cmte, 3-1
Senate, 14-14
Email your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Medicaid Expansion Amendments

This bill would expand Medicaid in Utah under the "Obamacare" federal law—a fiscally disastrous policy that other state budgets are reeling from as a result of expansion.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. We favor free market solutions to the pressing health insurance concerns that many Utahns have. Expanding an entitlement program and compelling taxpayers to fund it is not the proper role of government, nor the wise path forward to address this issue.

Davis, G.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Asset Forfeiture Transparency Amendments

This law would enhance a forfeiture transparency bill that Libertas Institute first proposed two years ago, in order to collect more information on how forfeiture cases are being handled.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. A recent poll showed that 86% of Utah voters oppose civil asset forfeiture. Given the concern over this issue, the public needs to gain a better understanding of how this law is being used, and how it might be further reformed.

Stephenson, H.SupportPending committee actionSenate cmte, 5-0
Senate, 28-0
Email your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Victim Selection Penalty Enhancements

This bill increases the level of a criminal penalty if a judge or jury finds that a person acted with "prejudice" against a person because of their ancestry, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Whether an assault was instigated by the aggressor's jealousy, drunkenness, anger, or discriminatory "prejudice" about the victim's personal characteristics is immaterial. Taxpayers should not be required to subsidize higher incarceration rates in pursuit of misnamed "social justice."

Thatcher, D.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Post-conviction DNA Testing Amendments

This bill lowers and clarifies the standard for DNA testing by allowing a convict to petition for DNA testing on the grounds that if DNA testing were used, they would have not been convicted or would have received a lesser sentence.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. This is especially important in cases where the convict's original lawyer failed to request DNA testing even though it was available. If the person is in fact innocent, or not guilty of the specific crime for which they were convicted, remedies should be easily available for justice to be served.

Hillyard, L.SupportPending Senate actionSenate cmte, 3-0
Senate 2nd, 25-0
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Vehicle Safety Inspection Amendments

Current law requires mandatory safety inspections for new vehicles in years four and eight. This bill would add another safety inspection on year six.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. There is no data to indicate that mandatory safety inspections reduce mechanical failure fatalities. In the absence of data to justify the program, it should be repealed, not increased in scope.

Ipson, D.OpposePending Senate actionSenate cmte, 5-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Local Government Licensing Amendments

Current law allows cities to require home-based businesses to obtain permits and pay fees as a condition of operating in the resident's home. These fees can often be significant compared to the revenue such businesses produce. This bill would largely carve out such small, home-based businesses, exempting them from licensure and fees.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. As no regulation is needed of lawful commercial enterprises conducted within one's home, cities should not be allowed to require such businesses to pay fees—since no corresponding services are provided to them for such payment.

Anderegg, J.SupportPending House actionSenate cmte, 6-0
Senate, 28-1
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Sales Tax Notification Amendments

This bill requires that companies who sell more than $500 worth of merchandise to a Utah customer provide the state with a statement of the customer's name, billing and shipping address, and the total dollar amount of the sales. This essentially turns out-of-state companies into tattle-tales.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. The state of Utah has no constitutional authority to deputize companies in this fashion that are not subject to Utah law, given that they have no presence within the state.

Harper, W.OpposePending Senate actionSenate cmte, 6-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Legislative Procedure Amendments

Legislation is often voted on soon after it's released, meaning that legislators have not had time to review it, let alone the public. This bill would require newly proposed legislation, including amendments and substitutes, be available for 48 hours before any vote.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. We have seen horrible bills sneak through the legislature because of no time to read them, so taking things a bit slower will help.

Anderegg, J.SupportIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Excess Damages Claims

If a person is injured or killed by a state or local government employee, Utah law arbitrary limits the amount of damages that can be awarded to the victim by a court. This bill would eliminate the arbitrary cap so that a person has an appeal process to be made whole when they are victimized a government employee.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Long-term medical bills after an accident could be financially devastating to any family and the federal government or a private company would compensate the victims of such an accident. Utah's state and local government offer no such guarantee, but we believe that it is time to start holding them accountable by eliminating the arbitrary cap on government immunity.

Iwamoto, J.SupportPending Senate actionSenate cmte, 4-1
Senate 2nd, 26-2
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Sales Tax Collection Amendments

This bill compels out-of-state companies to collect and remit sales taxes on purchases made by Utahns, if and when the company sells more than $100,000 in product or services to Utahns. It also creates up to $94 million in new revenue for the government without a corresponding tax decrease to be revenue neutral.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Out-of-state companies should not be deputized into tax collectors for the state of Utah, and the government should not be given new revenue without a corresponding tax decrease.

Bramble, C.OpposePending House actionSenate cmte, 7-0
Senate, 25-1
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Compulsory Education Revisions

When a child is habitually truant from school, the parent can currently be charged with a class B misdemeanor. This bill changes it to an infraction for first-time situations.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Parents are the stewards of their children and compulsory education laws violate their fundamental right to dictate how a child should be educated. Minimizing this parental punishment, and ultimately eliminating it, is an important goal.

Anderegg, J.SupportPending Senate actionSenate cmte, 5-0Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Residential Vocational and Life Skills Programs Amendments

This bill exempts institutions such as The Other Side Academy from existing regulations that apply to other types of organizations helping rehabilitate those in need. The Academy is a non-profit with a unique model that does not work if existing regulations were to be enforced upon them.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. The Academy follows an innovative approach taken by a similar organization in California that has successfully rehabilitated drug addicts and criminals without any taxpayer support. Utah law should exempt this organization from regulation to let it flourish.

Vickers, E.SupportPending committee actionEmail your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Income Tax Amendments

This bill would increase the state income tax to 7% for individuals earning more than $250,000 annually, and couples filing jointly who earn more than $500,000 annually.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill, as we oppose raising the income tax for any purpose, especially a punitive tax that increases based on one's earnings.

Dabakis, J.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Property Tax Relief Modifications

Utahns use more water than they otherwise would if they knew how much it costs. Many water districts hide the true cost in the property tax rather than on one's water bill. This bill would require urban areas to stop this practice of subsidizing water consumption through property taxes.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. Utah is a desert state and conservation of this precious resource is important. Marketing campaigns and harassment by elected officials have proven ineffective. Allowing market forces to apply to water consumption will provide the change that Utah needs.

Dabakis, J.SupportPending committee actionEmail your Senator/RepEmail the committee
Helmet Requirement Amendments

Current law requires motorcycle drivers under the age of 18 to wear a helmet. This bill would increase that age to 21, forcing adults age 18 to 21 to wear helmets.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. While cyclists should responsibly wear helmets, adults should not be compelled to do so by their own government.

Shiozawa, B.OpposePending Senate actionSenate cmte, 5-2
Senate 2nd, 18-10
Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Equal Pay Amendments

This bill compels business owners with 15 or more employees to adopt and disclose to employees a compensation policy. It also spends taxpayer dollars studying wages, building an index to catalog wages, and advertising the index to the public.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. It is not the proper role of government to compel a business owner to adopt such a policy, nor is it a justified use of taxpayer dollars to study and monitor wages in this fashion.

Anderegg, J.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
GRAMA Amendments

This bill limits Utah's open records law by telling government agencies that they do not need to respond to requests for private or protected documents received from incarcerated individuals or people on probation or parole, or the attorneys that represent them.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Especially because innocent people are at times incarcerated, the government must remain transparent to requests for records that may allow for an injustice to be remedied.

Bramble, C.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Retail Bag Impact Reduction Program

This bill imposes a 10 cent fee on the purchase and use of every retail plastic bag.

Libertas Institute opposes this bill. Taxes and fines should not be used in an effort to reduce waste or alter consumer behavior. Education or market incentives are legitimate, but a 10 cent tax on each bag purchased definitely is not.

Iwamoto, J.OpposeIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Food Truck Licensing and Regulation

This bill streamlines and removes regulations currently placed on food truck owners in Utah.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. As outlined in our policy brief last year, food truck owners face substantial regulation that severely restrict their ability to succeed. These reforms are a huge step in a positive direction for this industry.

Henderson, D.SupportIntroducedEmail your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor
Joint Resolution Amending Rules of Criminal Procedure

This bill aims to amend court rule to require prosecutors to disclose evidence that may exonerate the defendant, and allows for some potential accountability.

Libertas Institute supports this bill. While it doesn't go nearly as far as it should (as this should be a felony for prosecutors who do it), it's a good start.

Weiler, T.SupportPending Senate actionSenate cmte, 2-1Email your Senator/RepEmail the bill sponsor

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