Press Releases

New Report Gives Low Grade for Utah

August 16, 2016  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  5 comments

Salt Lake City, UT (August 16, 2016) — A new report issued by the Cato Institute, Freedom in the 50 States, highlights the degree to which states protect the personal and economic freedom of their citizens. Utah was ranked 20th.

The report—first published in 2009 by the Mercatus Center at George Mason University—grades states in three areas:

  • Fiscal policy: taxes, government employment, spending, debt, and fiscal decentralization
  • Regulatory policy: liability system, property rights, health insurance, and labor market
  • Personal freedom: a variety of categories including incarceration rates, marriage laws, education, guns, and alcohol

The report notes that “Utah does very well on regulatory policy overall” and “generally well on criminal justice policy,” though “quite poorly on alcohol, cannabis, gambling, and tobacco.”

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Statement on Federal Government’s Unwillingness to Reschedule Marijuana

August 11, 2016  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  No comments

Salt Lake City, UT (August 11, 2016) — The federal Drug Enforcement Administration announced today that it would not remove marijuana, or cannabis, from “Schedule 1,” which classifies it as a drug with “no currently accepted medical use.” In response, Libertas Institute president Connor Boyack issued the following statement:

Earlier this year, the Utah legislature shot down a comprehensive, well-regulated, and patient-oriented medical cannabis proposal that would have provided safe, legal access to thousands of sick Utahns needing cannabis. During the legislative session, many elected officials expressed a preference in instead asking the federal government to reschedule cannabis.

Today’s announcement by the DEA shows the futility of deferring to the federal government on this issue (in violation of the 10th amendment to the U.S. Constitution). Meanwhile, patients in Utah illegal using this alternative medicine continue to be criminalized. That is unacceptable.

We encourage the Utah Legislature to reconsider their actions and proactively provide these patients with legal protection from the criminal justice system—especially in light of the federal government’s misguided and self-interested refusal.

Utah is now in a minority of states that make the medicinal use of cannabis a crime. It’s time to find a consensus on this issue for the benefit of the suffering Utahns who need it.

Free Association Lawsuit Settlement Filed This Morning

July 13, 2016  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  No comments

Salt Lake City, UT (July 13, 2016) — A lawsuit filed last November by the Utah Taxpayers Association and Libertas Institute, represented by attorneys from the Center for Competitive Politics, has now reached a mutually agreeable settlement.

The lawsuit alleged that House Bill 43, passed by the Utah Legislature in 2013, was unconstitutional under the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the U.S. Constitution by seeking to compel non-profit organizations, for whom political activity is not a primary purpose, to disclose detailed information about their private donors.

In the settlement, the defendants recognize and agree that the law is “unconstitutional” as applied to our organizations, since political advocacy is not our major purpose. The state also agrees that House Bill 43 will not be enforced against organizations such as ours who engage “in constitutionally protected political advocacy and political issues advocacy.”

“House Bill 43, while well meaning, was reactionary legislation that resulted in our organization being unable to engage in the public square on an important ballot proposition,” said Connor Boyack, president of Libertas Institute. “This chilling effect was palpable and threatened to undermine our ability to educate Utahns in the future. We are pleased with the outcome that not only protects the free association and speech of our organizations as plaintiffs, but organizations throughout Utah as well.”

The settlement makes clear the following:

  • The state will not enforce HB43 against non-profit organizations who engage “in constitutionally protected political advocacy and political issues advocacy,” recognizing that doing so would be “unconstitutional unless those organizations are political action committees or political issues committees for which such advocacy is their major purpose.” In other words, 501(c)3 nonprofits that engage in political advocacy on a limited, infrequent basis (as in our case) are exempt from prosecution.
  • Exempted organizations in Utah—not just our organizations as plaintiffs—will not be fined or criminally charged for failing to comply with the provisions of HB43.
  • By the end of 2016, the state’s publications, websites, and other information about disclosure requirements will be changed to not indicate in any way that exempted organizations are required to disclose the information required by HB43.
  • Past, current, or future violations of HB43 by our organizations will not be prosecuted.
  • The consent decree (settlement) is an enforceable contract that can be used by us or another organization in the future as may be necessary, should the state violate its agreement not to enforce the law.

Given the state’s decision to no longer enforce key provisions of the law, we expect the Utah Legislature to amend the law in the 2017 General Session to align statute with the terms of today’s settlement.

86% of Utah voters oppose current civil asset forfeiture laws

March 22, 2016  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  One comment

Salt Lake City, UT (March 16, 2016) — A new poll of Utah voters shows overwhelming opposition to current law that allows police to seize, and prosecutors to forfeit, property from individuals not charged with—let alone convicted of—a crime.

The poll, commissioned by Drug Policy Action and conducted by Public Policy Polling last week, surveyed 565 voters. 77% of respondents indicated that they were unaware of civil asset forfeiture law. When provided a brief summary, 86% indicated that, “Police should not be able to seize and permanently take away property from people who have not been charged with a crime.”

“We often discuss civil asset forfeiture with groups of Utahns around the state,” said Connor Boyack, president of Libertas Institute. “Without fail, many in the audience are astounded to learn that the government is able to legally steal property from people not charged with any crime. It violates our sense of justice and due process. This poll affirms that most Utahns feel the same way, and that reform is needed to bring state law into alignment with what voters believe.”

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New Constitutional Amendment Proposal Announced

December 16, 2015  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  No comments

Salt Lake City, UT (December 16, 2015) — Libertas Institute is pleased to announce a new proposal to amend Utah’s Constitution to protect property rights. The proposed amendment—a single word—will be sponsored as priority legislation by Representative Mel Brown.

Libertas Institute has published a new policy brief explaining the history of the issue, details of the proposed single-word amendment, along with examples that the amendment would address. A copy was delivered to each legislator last week.

“It’s widely believed that property rights are a fundamental aspect of good government,” said Connor Boyack, president of Libertas Institute. “But our research, along with conversations with land use attorneys, property owners, and city officials, makes clear one simple fact: they don’t actually exist to the degree most people would expect.”

“This constitutional amendment, though simple, is significant,” Boyack continued. “Property rights protections are out of balance, and judges lack the ability to overturn the actions of neighbors or cities that violate this right, simply because there is no relevant constitutional language. We’re hoping to fix that with this proposal.”

The policy brief highlights an example from the town of Virgin, Utah, where a land owner’s investment of millions of dollars to build an RV park was roadblocked due to a narrow majority of neighbors succeeding in a referendum to overturn the town council’s action and shut down the owner’s ability to develop his property. The land remains vacant. Read more here.

The constitutional amendment aims to balance a property owner’s right against the city’s ability to arbitrarily restrict this right, unless a compelling state interest can be shown in protection of the public health, safety, and welfare.

“For years we’ve heard and collected stories of people’s property rights being violated in Utah, and now we’re excited to offer a simple solution that will restore balance between a property owner’s rights, and the interests of city government,” said Josh Daniels, policy analyst at Libertas Institute. “We are confident that the legislature will recognize the importance of this amendment and submit it favorably to Utah voters on the 2016 ballot.”

New Ranking Scores Utah’s Cities on Individual Liberty, Private Property, Free Market

December 2, 2015  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  7 comments

Salt Lake City, UT (December 2, 2015) — Libertas Institute announced today the results of a new, unique research project—the first of its kind in the country. The “Freest Cities Index” analyzes Utah’s top 50 most populous cities on over 100 metrics dealing with city laws and fees to analyze in which city Utahns will enjoy the most freedom.

Freest City: Heber City
Least Free City: Salt Lake City

The Freest Cities Index uses statistical weighting and calculation to compute a relative score to determine each city’s ranking. Broken into three categories—individual liberty, private property rights, and free markets—the Index includes metrics such as: free speech, gun regulations, alcohol sales, city debt, business permit fees, sales taxes, city-owned enterprises, and many more.

Libertas Institute has placed two billboards in the winning and losing cities. The Salt Lake City billboard is located one block east of City Hall — along 400 South, between 200 and 300 East.


High quality photos can be downloaded at this link. Permission is granted for publication/broadcast use.

“Our report contains a treasure trove of data on cities,” said Josh Daniels, a policy analyst at Libertas Institute who oversaw the research team for the project. “In two minutes, Utahns can quickly get up to speed on how their city performs on a wide range of issues, relative to other cities. Nothing like this has ever been done, and we’re thrilled to provide this service to our fellow Utahns.”

“City governments throughout the state are in sore need of transparency and accountability,” said Connor Boyack, president of Libertas Institute. “We routinely hear from Utahns who are frustrated with their city yet lack the knowledge or time to investigate the issues that matter. This Index provides a huge leap forward in both educating and empowering individuals throughout Utah to make a positive change in their community.”

The “2015 Freest City” award was presented to the Heber City Council on November 19, 2015. Click below for a photo:


High quality photos can be downloaded at this link. Permission is granted for publication/broadcast use.

Full results, including the detailed data spreadsheets, can be found at FreestCities.org.

New Lawsuit Announced to Support Free Speech and Association

November 16, 2015  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  No comments

Salt Lake City, UT (November 16, 2015) — A new lawsuit will be filed tomorrow morning seeking to overturn a recently enacted law that compels private non-profit organizations to publicly disclose the personal information of their donors when the organization spends $750 or more on political activity in a single year. The brief alleges that this law—House Bill 43, passed in the 2013 legislative session—is unconstitutional under the First and Fourteenth Amendments.

Libertas Institute is a plaintiff in the lawsuit, along with the Utah Taxpayers Association.

  • What: Announcement of a new lawsuit against Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox, Attorney General Sean Reyes, District Attorney Sim Gill, and District Attorney Jeff Buhman
  • Where: Utah Capitol, Presentation Room (first floor, next to Visitor’s Center)
  • When: Tuesday, November 17, 10am

House Bill 43 was sponsored by now-Speaker Greg Hughes, and was filed in response to a political consultant’s illegal use of non-profit organizations to hide the identity of the source of his donors—from the payday lending industry—to fund a negative campaign against Representative Brad Daw, who had sought to regulate the industry’s practices.

“Free speech and association are fundamental aspects of what it means to be an American—and Utahn,” said Connor Boyack, president of Libertas Institute. “They should not be undermined because of rogue political consultants and reactionary legislatures. We look forward to the judicial scrutiny this lawsuit will bring and are hopeful that this problematic law will be declared unconstitutional.”

The plaintiffs in the case are represented by Allen Dickerson and Owen D. Yeates, attorneys working with the Center for Competitive Politics.

Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Ruling Legalizing Same-Sex Marriage Nationwide

June 26, 2015  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  5 comments

Salt Lake City, UT (June 26, 2015) — In response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s opinion this morning, legalizing same-sex marriages throughout the nation, Libertas Institute president Connor Boyack issued the following response:

“Our LGBT friends have good reason to be happy today, but those concerned about our laws and legal structure have great cause for alarm. As Chief Justice Roberts said in his dissent, ‘The majority’s decision is an act of will, not legal judgment. The right it announces has no basis in the Constitution or this Court’s precedent… Just who do we think we are?’

“Today’s opinion—and let’s be clear, that’s all it is—provides an opportunity for lawmakers to reconsider their long-standing support for government intervention in such an important societal relationship. In the coming months, we will be encouraging elected officials to consider a proposal to repeal government licensure of marriage, allowing churches, notaries public, and others to privately officiate and sanction these unions.

“Despite what some lawyers think, there is no ‘fundamental right’ to a government permission slip. The long-standing violation of the sacred union of marriage—encouraged by those looking to shape society to match their vision—needs to be fixed.”

A similar proposal recently passed the Alabama State Senate 22-3, but the legislature adjourned before it was considered in the House. Libertas Institute is encouraging supporters to sign this petition.

New Public Policy Brief Encourages Opposition to EPA

June 3, 2015  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  One comment

Lawmakers interested in protecting private property rights in Utah

Salt Lake City, UT (June 3, 2015) — Libertas Institute has issued a new Public Policy Brief in the wake of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalizing its highly controversial rule, expanding their authority over intrastate bodies of water—including small streams—inside Utah.

The Public Policy Brief has been sent to lawmakers and other interested parties, with encouragement to begin planning opposition to the rule, and legal protection for property owners in Utah. Libertas Institute has spoken with several lawmakers interested in working on this issue in the coming months.

“The EPA needs to be put on notice that its unilateral expansion of bureaucratic authority will not be tolerated in Utah,” said Josh Daniels, policy analyst for Libertas Institute. “Several states have already begun pushing back, and Utah needs to join them; property owners throughout Utah need to be protected from burdensome regulations, bureaucratic hoops, and unreasonable compliance costs to peaceably and productively use their private property.”

The Brief contains analysis of the rule itself, the case law and legal issues surrounding EPA’s governance over the “waters of the United States,” an analysis of what other states are doing to resist the rule, and recommendations on what Utah legislators can and should do.

 

Libertas Institute Announces Series of Public Meetings to Discuss Medical Cannabis

May 14, 2015  |  Posted in: Press Releases  |  One comment

Libertas Institute has scheduled several public forum meetings to discuss Senator Madsen’s proposal to legalize medical cannabis in Utah. The first meeting, the details of which are below, will focus on law enforcement, criminal justice, and banking regulatory issues.

We expect this to be a standing room only event with over 300 people showing up. We will save a few seats for media in the front; please arrive early.

  • Where: Wildcat Theater, Shepherd Union Building, Weber State University
    3848 Harrison Blvd, Ogden, UT 84408
  • When: Tuesday, May 19, 7-8:30pm
  • Who: Senator Mark Madsen, sponsor of the legislation; Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill; 22-year undercover Utah narcotics agent Allen Larsen; Christine Stenquist, director of Drug Policy Project of Utah; and Representative Marc Roberts, president of a high-risk payment processing company.

Future meetings will discuss patient stories, medical research, regulatory issues, PTSD, and other topics.

“Few legislators oppose this policy, but there was some legitimate concerns during the previous legislative session that it was happening too quickly and that there were unanswered questions,” said Connor Boyack, president of Libertas Institute. “As a result, we’re holding meetings statewide to openly discuss the bill, field questions, resolve concerns, and educate the public about the importance of and need for medical cannabis as a treatment option for many sick and suffering Utahns.”

Senator Mark Madsen commented, “I’m eager to participate in these meetings. For Utahns like me who sincerely believe in individual liberty and limited government, and who are interested in learning about medical cannabis, these public forums will be invaluable. People need to become informed and weigh in if we are ever going to stop government from making decisions for people that are better left to them and their physicians.”

A poll conducted by Y2 Analytics earlier this year found that 72% of likely voters in Utah support the proposed legislation.

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